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The campaign against clubroot.

The sustainability of the Canadian canola industry is our primary consideration when developing and deploying recommendations on the use of clubroot resistant hybrids. The use of genetic resistance is only a small part of a larger integrated pest management (IPM) strategy that includes:

  • Canola rotation of a minimum of once every three years
  • Taking sanitation steps to limit the movement of infected soil
  • Control volunteer canola and other brassica weeds that can act as hosts for the disease
  • Utilize patch management to limit the movement of clubroot on your farm
  • Scouting to identify the presence of the disease
  • Clubroot-resistant genetics are only effective as a sustainable practice if deployed as part of an IPM strategy and should not be relied upon as a single strategy to manage clubroot

Clubroot resistance from InVigor Virtual Field Tours.

A virtual tour with integrated pest management tips for clubroot management and the clubroot-resistant options from InVigor® hybrid canola.

Clubroot resistance technology sheet.

Learn more about clubroot resistance technology from InVigor and the benefits it provides to fields where clubroot is a concern.

Clubroot-resistant genetics decision tree.

InVigor has a number of clubroot-resistant options to choose from in this year’s lineup. However, not all genetic profiles should be deployed in the same way. Learn how to effectively select between first and second generation genetics by using our handy clubroot-resistant genetics decision tree.

Clubroot-resistant genetics from InVigor.

All InVigor clubroot-resistant hybrids have been developed to be resistant to the most predominant clubroot pathotypes found in Canada at the time of their registration.

InVigor L340PC, InVigor L345PC, InVigor Choice LR344PC, InVigor L255PC, InVigor L352C, InVigor L241C and InVigor Health L258HPC all share the same first generation clubroot resistance profile. InVigor L234PC has this resistance profile plus it contains second generation multigenic clubroot resistance to additional clubroot pathotypes to help combat evolving clubroot pathotypes. Second generation clubroot resistance is designed to combat clubroot in fields known to have clubroot and following two cycles of first generation clubroot resistance or until clubroot symptoms appear, whichever comes first.

Clubroot populations in the field can evolve or shift to new pathotypes that current resistant hybrids may be susceptible to. These new pathotypes may become dominant in the clubroot population if no additional integrated pest management approaches are taken and canola hybrids with similar resistance profiles are used repeatedly in the same field. To maximize the durability of genetic resistance in canola hybrids, use an integrated pest management strategy that includes extending rotations in areas where clubroot is a concern. We support the Canola Council of Canada's agronomic recommendations when growing these InVigor hybrids.

Incorporating a clubroot-resistant hybrid into your integrated pest management plan is an excellent tool to aid in clubroot management.

InVigor Results.


Visit InVigorResults.ca for localized trial results and compare the performance of InVigor hybrid canola versus the competition.

2021 InVigor hybrid canola lineup.


See everything you need to know about the updated InVigor hybrid canola lineup for the 2021 season, including two new 300 series hybrids.

Clubroot-resistant hybrids.

A new InVigor® hybrid canola 300 series hybrid for growers that want the complete package. With patented Pod Shatter Reduction technology and first generation clubroot resistance, this mid-maturing hybrid demonstrated exceptional yields in both external Western Canadian Canola/Rapeseed Recommending Committee (WCC/RRC) and internal trials.


Yield potential 108.9% of the new checks (InVigor L233P and Pioneer® 45H33) in 2019 WCC/RRC trials
107.8% of InVigor L233P (n=16 trials, 2019)
Maturity 1 day earlier than InVigor L252
Height Medium
Lodging resistance Strong
Blackleg rating R (resistant)
Growing zones All growing zones
Herbicide system(s) LibertyLink®
Agronomic trait(s) Patented Pod Shatter Reduction technology
First generation clubroot resistance

InVigor L345PC offers a significant jump in yield potential over InVigor L233P and features our patented Pod Shatter Reduction technology plus first generation clubroot resistance. This hybrid is suitable for all growing zones.


Yield potential 111.9% of the checks (InVigor 5440 and Pioneer® 45H29) in the 2017/2018 WCC/RRC trials
111.4% of InVigor L233P (n=28 trials, 2018)
Maturity 1 day earlier than InVigor L252
Height Medium
Lodging resistance Strong
Blackleg rating R (resistant)
Growing zones All growing zones
Herbicide system(s) LibertyLink
Agronomic trait(s) Patented Pod Shatter Reduction technology
First generation clubroot resistance

InVigor L352C has a similar maturity to InVigor L252 with higher yields and features first generation clubroot resistance. This hybrid is a strong replacement for InVigor L252, since it’s the ideal hybrid for growers who prefer to swath their canola.

Yield potential 108.6% of the checks (InVigor 5440 and Pioneer® 45H29) in the 2017/2018 WCC/RRC trials
104% of InVigor L252 (n=28 trials, 2018)
Maturity ½ day later than InVigor L252
Height Medium
Lodging resistance Strong
Blackleg rating R (resistant)
Growing zones All growing zones
Herbicide system(s) LibertyLink
Agronomic trait(s) First generation clubroot resistance

The first-of-its-kind InVigor Choice canola hybrid features both the LibertyLink technology system and TruFlex™ canola with Roundup Ready® Technology. As if that isn’t enough, you’ll also have the benefits of patented Pod Shatter Reduction technology and first generation clubroot resistance from InVigor. This hybrid is perfect for growers looking to combine high-yielding InVigor genetics with the flexibility of Liberty® herbicide or Roundup® herbicide applications.


Yield potential 104.1% of the new checks (InVigor L233P & Pioneer® 45H33) in 2018 WCC/RRC trials
103.6% of InVigor L233P (n=12 trials, 2018)
Maturity Over 1 day earlier than InVigor L252
Height Medium
Lodging resistance Strong
Blackleg rating R (resistant)
Growing zones All growing zones
Herbicide system(s) LibertyLink herbicide technology system and TruFlex with Roundup Ready® Technology
Agronomic trait(s) Patented Pod Shatter Reduction technology
First generation clubroot resistance

Featuring Pod Shatter Reduction technology and second generation clubroot resistance, this hybrid is a great fit for growers in known clubroot-affected areas. We recommend growing InVigor L234PC with second generation clubroot resistance after two cycles of growing first generation clubroot-resistant hybrids in clubroot-affected areas or when clubroot symptoms are noticed in first generation clubroot-resistant hybrids (whichever comes first).


Yield potential 104% of the checks (InVigor 5440 and Pioneer® 45H29) in 2017 WCC/RRC trials
Maturity 3 days earlier than the average of the checks
Height Medium
Lodging resistance Good
Blackleg rating R (resistant)
Growing zones All growing zones
Herbicide system(s) LibertyLink
Agronomic trait(s) Patented Pod Shatter Reduction technology
Second generation clubroot resistance

InVigor L255PC offers Pod Shatter Reduction, first generation clubroot resistance and separates itself from other hybrids due to its very impressive standability. A great fit for growers in the mid to long growing zones.


Yield potential 109% of the checks (InVigor 5440 and Pioneer® 45H29) in 2016 WCC/RRC trials
Maturity 1.5 days later than the average of the checks
Height Medium
Lodging resistance Strong
Blackleg rating R (resistant)
Growing zones All mid to long growing zones
Herbicide system(s) LibertyLink
Agronomic trait(s) Patented Pod Shatter Reduction technology
First generation clubroot resistant

You can expect strong standability and high yields from this mid-maturing hybrid with first generation clubroot resistance. InVigor L241C is well suited for growers who prefer to swath in all clubroot-affected regions of Western Canada.


Yield potential 102% of the checks (InVigor 5440 and Pioneer® 45H29) in 2012/2013 WCC/RRC trials
Maturity 1 day earlier than the average of the checks
Height Short to medium
Lodging resistance Very Strong
Blackleg rating R (resistant)
Growing zones All growing zones
Herbicide system(s) LibertyLink
Agronomic trait(s) First generation clubroot resistance

InVigor Health L258HPC offers the security of a contract premium. This high-yielding hybrid is suitable for all mid to long growing zones and offers patented Pod Shatter Reduction technology as well as first generation clubroot resistance. InVigor Health L258HPC produces a specialty oil profile that is more heat stable and higher in oleic acid.


Yield potential 104.9% of the checks (InVigor 5440 and Pioneer® 45H29) in 2017 WCC/RRC trials
Maturity 1.5 days later than the average of the checks
Height Medium
Lodging resistance Strong
Blackleg rating R (resistant)
Growing zones All mid to long growing zones
Herbicide system(s) LibertyLink
Agronomic trait(s) Patented Pod Shatter Reduction technology
First generation clubroot resistance
Specialty oil

InVigor Results.


Visit InVigorResults.ca for localized trial results and compare the performance of InVigor hybrid canola versus the competition.

The dirt on clubroot.

Clubroot is a serious soil-borne disease in canola. Infected roots develop galls that impede water and nutrient uptake. This slows or halts crop growth and development, leading to lower yields. Research has shown that yield loss can be estimated by dividing the percentage of infected stems by half.

The best way to confirm the presence of clubroot is to dig up plants that appear to be dying or prematurely ripening. Infection leads to galls on the roots, ranging from tiny nodules to large club-shaped outgrowths. Galls are firm and white but become soft and greyish-brown as they mature and decay. Infected plants show signs of wilting, stunting and yellowing, but considerable damage can be done below ground before symptoms aboveground begin to appear. The crop may also ripen pre-maturely and lead to shriveled seeds.

Putting an integrated pest management (IPM) plan in place is the first step to take when confronted or concerned with clubroot.

Clubroot-resistant genetics from InVigor.

Using a hybrid with built-in resistance is one tool available to help manage the disease. Maximize and protect the potential of your crop with InVigor® hybrids that contain a "C" in their name, as they've all been designed to help defend against clubroot and maximize yield.

All InVigor clubroot-resistant hybrids have been developed to be resistant to the most predominant clubroot pathotypes found in Canada at the time of their registration.

InVigor L340PC, InVigor L345PC, InVigor Choice LR344PC, InVigor L255PC, InVigor L352C, InVigor L241C and InVigor Health L258HPC all share the same first generation clubroot resistance profile. InVigor L234PC has this resistance profile plus it contains second generation multigenic clubroot resistance to additional clubroot pathotypes to help combat evolving clubroot pathotypes.

Best management practices for clubroot.

Clubroot is a particularly difficult pest to control that can cause significant yield losses in canola. There are currently no registered chemical products to control clubroot, so the strategy to control clubroot is to integrate multiple best practices to perserve canola for years to come.

Two men talking with a tractor behind them in a field

Clubroot management in the field.

Practice good sanitation. This helps reduce the transfer of diseases through contaminated soil and crop debris. Be sure to clean equipment prior to moving to another canola field. Limit or eliminate external traffic on fields.
Pull infected plants. If you catch the disease early and there is a relatively small patch of incidence, consider pulling the infected plants and either burn them or bury them in a landfill.
Use resistant hybrids. Grow first generation InVigor clubroot-resistant hybrids at the first sign of clubroot in the field or if clubroot is present in the farming community that includes the area where you or others conduct your farming activities. This community can include equipment or contractors that have travelled from other fields. If growers are still (or start) seeing issues in their first generation clubroot-resistant hybrid while still following a one-in-three-year canola rotation, or have grown first generation clubroot resistance in fields known to contain clubroot for two cycles, we recommend growers consider switching to a second generation hybrid.
Control weeds and volunteers. Cruciferous weeds, such as wild mustard and shepherd's-purse, can serve as hosts for clubroot in non-canola years.
Limit tillage. Use soil conservation practices to reduce spread of resting spores.
Monitor moisture levels. Frequently monitor your fields for moisture levels. Well-drained soils can help prevent the movement and may help minimize the development of the disease.
Rotate Crops. A one-in-three-year or greater rotation is recommended. Note that cruciferous crops can also act as hosts to clubroot.
Scout crops regularly and carefully. Assess the field as a whole and look for patches of crop showing wilting, premature ripening or stress symptoms. Pay particular attention to field entrances and areas of high traffic. Dig up plants at or after swathing to check for galls on the roots.
Patch Management. Once you have identified a clubroot-infested patch, your next step is patch management, a protocol pioneered by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada research scientist Dr. Bruce Gossen in Saskatoon. The first step in this process is to pull all the affected plants. This could take hours or a few days depending on the size of the infestation but it’s key to stopping the spread of clubroot. Dispose of the diseased plants carefully – either store them in plastic bags and bring them to the landfill or burn them.
For more information on clubroot and the strategies mentioned above, visit clubroot.ca

Resistance doesn't last forever.

A hybrid that once showed resistance to clubroot in your field might not always show that same resistance. If characteristic galls are found on canola in areas of thin and early-ripening patches, it is likely the clubroot population in the field has shifted.

Fields that have clubroot have more than one pathotype in the soil. With the use of resistance genetics, you can control the pathotypes that your hybrid has resistance to, but over time, because there are spores from other pathotypes that are not being controlled, you could see the predominant pathotype shift in your field. Also, selection pressure on the pathotypes being controlled can cause genetic changes in the virulence of the pathogen to overcome resistance.

The shifted or newly-introduced population should be pathotyped and we recommend growing InVigor L234PC with second generation clubroot resistance.

Frequently asked questions about clubroot in canola.

There is currently no clubroot found on my farm or in my farming community. What InVigor hybrid should I be growing?

Grow the InVigor hybrid that best meets your needs for yield potential and agronomic characteristics (either non-clubroot resistant or first generation clubroot resistant). Remember to keep scouting for clubroot on your farm and utilize good IPM strategies, regardless of your hybrid choice.

I have not identified clubroot on my farm, but it is a growing concern in my area. What InVigor hybrid should I be growing?

Grow a non-clubroot-resistant or a first generation clubroot-resistant InVigor hybrid, whichever you feel performs best on your farm and in your area. Remember to keep scouting for clubroot on your farm and utilize good IPM strategies.

Other companies are labeling what pathotypes they are resistant to. What is BASF's response to this approach?

The science and nomenclature are evolving, and we continue to learn about clubroot population dynamics. Secondly, clubroot pathotypes within populations are diverse and are highly variable within a field. Generalizations about predominant pathotypes can lead to poor field performance. Furthermore, there are no commercial testing facilities providing robust pathotyping for clubroot currently.

What is a clubroot-resistant canola hybrid?

A clubroot-resistant hybrid is a hybrid that is bred to be resistant to clubroot. This means that it is resistant to the predominant clubroot strains or pathotypes in Western Canada. No clubroot-resistant hybrids, including new ones with multiple resistance genes, are resistant to all the clubroot pathotypes detected in Western Canada to date. There is a classification system ranging from:

Resistant (R) – less than 30% infection compared to susceptible checks.
Intermediate (I) – between 30 and 50% infection compared to susceptible checks.
Susceptible (S) – more than 50% infection compared to susceptible checks.

Who should be growing a clubroot-resistant hybrid?

If you have clubroot on your farm or you know that there are fields that are infected with clubroot in the community that you farm in, you should be growing a resistant hybrid.

What is a farming community?

With respect to clubroot, a farming community is the area where you or others conduct your farming activities. If you farm across a large geography, or if you have external contractors that drive in your fields (custom work, agronomic support, etc.) and they travel larger distances, your community will be quite large.

If you find clubroot in your field(s) for the first time, what should be done?

The goal with scouting for clubroot is to find the problem early.

  1. Pull the infected plants and either burn them or bury them in a landfill.
  2. Lime the area to increase the soil pH – talk to your Canola Council of Canada Agronomist regarding lime sources, particle sizes and rates, as this is an area where the science is quickly evolving.
  3. Stop the movement of dirt from 2X the area and consider planting it to grass.
  4. Increase your canola rotation to a minimum of 1 in 3 years.
  5. Increase the scouting on your farm.
  6. At a minimum, tell your neighbors that you found clubroot and tell them what your management plan is. Also consider reporting to the local Canola Council of Canada Agronomist.
  7. Grow a resistant hybrid – consider first generation genetics.
  8. Control colunteer canola and other brassica species in canola and non-canola crops.
I have not identified clubroot on my farm, but some of my neighbours have found it on theirs. What InVigor hybrid should I be growing?

Consider growing a first generation clubroot-resistant InVigor hybrid combined with aggressive scouting and good IPM strategies.

I have identified clubroot on my farm in non-clubroot-resistant hybrids. What InVigor hybrid should I be growing?

Grow a first generation clubroot-resistant InVigor hybrid on all your canola acres combined with aggressive scouting and good IPM strategies for managing clubroot, which includes extending your crop rotation to a minimum of 1 in 3 years. For example:

Year 1: Canola
Year 2: Wheat
Year 3: Soybean
Year 4: Canola

I have identified clubroot on my farm in non-clubroot-resistant hybrids and have grown first generation clubroot-resistant hybrids for the last two cycles. What InVigor hybrid should I be growing?

Consider growing second generation clubroot-resistant InVigor hybrids across all your canola acres combined with aggressive scouting and good IPM strategies. First generation hybrids can still be an option, providing you actively scout for clubroot and implement a minimum 1-in-3-year crop rotation.

I have identified clubroot in my first generation clubroot-resistant hybrids. What InVigor hybrid should I be growing?

Start growing second generation clubroot-resistant InVigor hybrids combined with aggressive scouting and good IPM strategies which includes extending your crop rotation to a minimum of 1 in 3 years.

What should growers and agronomists look for in terms of clubroot and where?
  • Look for areas with premature ripening, thin canola areas.

    FAQ IMAGE 1

    Source: Strelkov, S., 2015. Found in Clubroot disease of canola and mustard, Agri-Facts, Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development

  • Scout near field entrances and areas where water has moved soil.
  • Pull plants and look for gall formations on roots – if late in the season, galls may have decayed into sawdust-like brown material. DNA tests can provide confirmation.

    FAQ IMAGE 2

    Source: Turkington, K., 2015. Found in Clubroot disease of canola and mustard, Agri-Facts, Alberta Agriculture and Rural Development

  • If no patches exist, then dig up the roots of random plants near field entrances or other high-traffic areas.
  • Scout non-canola fields and look at brassica weeds e.g. shepherd's-purse, stinkweed, flixweed, wild mustard and volunteer canola, which can act as a host and become infected.
  • Be sure to consider volunteer canola as a potential source of clubroot, even if the volunteers are from a clubroot-resistant hybrid.
You've been growing a clubroot-resistant hybrid and now are noticing patches that are thin and ripening early and are seeing large galls on the roots. What should be done?

Follow the same steps outlined above with the addition of the following:

  • Consider having the shifted or newly introduced population pathotyped. Fields in Western Canada that have more than 1 pathotype in the soil. With the use of resistance genetics, you will control the pathotypes that your hybrid has resistance to, but over time because there are spores from other pathotypes that are not being controlled you could see the predominant pathotype shift in your field. Also, selection pressure on the pathotypes being controlled can cause genetic changes in virulence of the pathogen to overcome resistance. To get galls tested for the predominant pathotype talk to your local Canola Council of Canada Agronomist who can get it sent to the University of Alberta for pathotyping.
  • Grow a canola hybrid with second generation genetics the next time you grow canola on that field.
How much yield loss can growers expect from clubroot in canola?

0 to 100% – the following are estimates based on field observations if you do not use control measures:

  • 1st year yield losses are typically below 1%.
  • 2nd canola cycle: approximately 10% yield loss.
  • 3rd canola cycle: greater than 50% yield loss.
  • 4th canola cycle: 90% or greater yield loss.
What is the difference between high spore load and low spore load?

It is very difficult to quantify a low spore load, we can only tell if farmers have a high spore load – 1x105 spores per gram of soil is a high spore load.

  • Soil tests for clubroot spore load results could be used to assess the clubroot risk level, but the downside of this test could be that it could create problems for interpretation. Fewer spores mean lower risk, but clubroot infection can still occur at 1,000 spores per gram of soil, or less. If one field has 10,000 spores per gram and the neighbouring field has 100,000, both fields could have a problem due to potential soil movement between fields. Furthermore, if a test shows 1,000,000 spores per gram, the field is clearly at risk and symptoms are likely to appear under most conditions.
  • Adding to the grey area is that results can be different depending on the lab (results cannot be compared lab to lab because of their different sampling, storage, extraction and analysis protocols).
  • When sampling to determine the spore load in a heavily-infested area, collect samples from only that area, as a composite sample from other areas may dilute the spore concentration. Also, to get a fair estimate of spore load within a heavily-infested area, include soil from the canola row and from between the rows. (Canola Watch how to test for clubroot pathogen, 2018)
  • The bottom line on soil testing for clubroot is that several labs offer this service, and positive results can be a useful management tool, but negative results do not mean the field is risk-free as it could just come down to not sampling the right area.
What is a first generation versus second generation clubroot hybrid?
  • First generation hybrids contain resistance genetics that were initially deployed to combat clubroot for InVigor hybrid canola. This includes includes InVigor L340PC, InVigor L345PC, InVigor L352C, InVigor Choice LR344PC, InVigor L241C, InVigor L255PC and InVigor Health L258HPC. They were designed to control the predominant pathotypes in Western Canada at the time of their registration.
  • Second generation hybrids contain additional sources of resistance designed with multiple genes so that they are effective against a wider range of pathotypes.
In a confirmed clubroot field, how quickly will the pathotypes shift if you have been growing a clubroot-resistant hybrid?

It depends on your rotation. If you are farming with a short rotation (more frequent than 1 canola crop every 3 years) under a high clubroot spore load you could see the predominant pathotype shift after your second canola crop.

Under a lower spore load and a longer rotation between canola crops you will get more canola crop cycles.

What clubroot pathotypes is InVigor L234PC resistant to? Where should it be grown?
  • The nomenclature around clubroot pathotyping continues to evolve as the science and detection methods advance. Due to this uncertainty, there is real risk that what we believe is a particular pathotype today, may actually be a population of multiple pathotypes that we have yet to understand.
  • InVigor® L234PC is resistant to the predominant pathotypes present across Western Canada, plus additional recent newer pathotypes.
  • InVigor L234PC has been tested and is resistant against a wide range of clubroot pathotypes, including many of the new pathotypes that have been identified, and we are confident that InVigor L234PC is going to be effective against most of these new and emerging pathotypes.
  • In fields where InVigor L345PC, InVigor L352C, InVigor Choice LR344PC, InVigor L241C, InVigor L255PC and InVigor Health L258HPC cannot be grown due to the pathotypes that have overcome the resistance within these hybrids, InVigor L234PC can be used as it will perform better due to additional effectiveness against some of the new pathotypes.
  • We recommend growing InVigor L234PC with second generation clubroot resistance after two cycles of growing first generation clubroot-resistant hybrids in clubroot-affected areas or when clubroot symptoms are noticed in first generation clubroot-resistant hybrids (whichever comes first).
  • For a visual tool to help you recognize when second generation clubroot resistance is the right fit for your field, visit https://agro.basf.ca/basf_solutions/images/IVGH2020-SALN-BEFJHC/$File/InVigor_Clubroot_Flowchart.pdf.

Clubroot-resistant canola decision checklist.

Each grower has a different level of risk tolerance and needs to make decisions appropriate for their farming operation. If you feel that you are doing a good job with the checklist, then growing an InVigor hybrid that best fits your operation is likely the best decision for your farm. Otherwise, growing a clubroot-resistant hybrid will be your best choice.

  • Growing canola in a 1 in 3 year or greater rotation.
  • Scouting, especially near field entrances for early detection of clubroot.
  • Minimizing tillage to prevent soil movement.
  • Limiting or eliminating external traffic on fields.
  • Cleaning equipment prior to entering fields.
  • Having a soil pH of 7.2 or greater, or considering liming of fields with lower pH.